Market research/Analytics company Kantar Worldpanel has released a report on the sales of Android phones across Europe and also Australia and it shows that Australian sales for mobile phones running Android is at 56.9%, up 20.5% from the same time last year. As you can see from the table below, the 20.5% increase has come at the expense of phones running the Symbian, RIM and iOS operating systems, in my opinion this is perfectly understandable in the case of RIM and Symbian, however the iOS adoption rate should rise once again after the announcement and release of a new iPhone expected later in the year.

Another interesting point to note is that RIM seemingly cannot even compete with Windows Mobile, we’re not talking Windows Phone 7 which also grew, but the older Windows Mobile OS, so that isn’t good news for them. Check out the source link for the full release including statistics on Europe and the US.

Source(s): Kantar WorldPanel
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  • vijay alapati

    and most of them run 2.2 or 2.3 :(

  • Tb

    New data like this makes me even more annoyed that I am still waiting for a decent ANZ mobile banking app. The whole saga has become a little ridiculous!

  • vince

    Its sooner than expected, not a surprise though.

    With new android phones coming out every month, there is just a lot of choices for everyone.

    Besides most iPhones we see on the streets are mostly the 2 yr old Iphone 4, sales percentage of the 4S is not that high.

    • http://twitter.com/432wheels Greg Lamb

      Exactly what I was saying. iPhone 4 was released end of July here. You’ll find most iPhone 3 owners (2 years before that) traded up to the 4 when their contracts expired. I still see a lot of people with the 3/3GS form on the streets. A lot of those will probably trade up to another iPhone (4/4S on a deal or 5 when it comes out). Shear volume of numbers doesn’t necessarily make a good platform? How well a system caters for the majority and how well it retains the users year after year is a better example of how good a platform is.

  • http://www.facebook.com/michael.macarthur Michael Macarthur

    I went down to my local Optus outlet today to get my new S3. I know the team well and there used to be a lot of banter asking if I was going to buy a grownup phone (iphone) when I got my old sammy S1 n my wife’s S2. Well I went there today to find not one staff member actually had an iphone but all S3′s and one X’s. They were all really excited by how good the android phones had become. So no, I am not surprised at these figures at all.

  • http://twitter.com/432wheels Greg Lamb

    Initial sales may be good. Will be interesting to see retention rates for the platforms though. Most people I know that have bought and Android (generally non techy people) have only bought it because it was cheap when recontracting. After their contract has been up, they’ve moved to an iPhone or some completely basic non smartphone. Will be interesting to see figures on people recontracting from one Android phone to another.

    • Chris

      I see the opposite. I see most of my friends now moving from iOS to Android because it is better for them, customisable and open.

      • Greg

        This has been my experience too.

    • dazweeja

      I’m not sure what you mean by “initial sales”. This is the continuation of a trend that has been going on for more than two years. I think the retention rates for people buying new phones running Android ICS will be very high although I understand that those that bought a mid-range phone running Froyo a couple of years ago may have been frustrated by some aspects of Android.

    • http://twitter.com/432wheels Greg Lamb

      By initial sales I mean first time Android buyers. Android has really only taken off since 2.x and large sales are seen as there are lots of models of handsets at a range of affordable prices. A large number of phones are still on 2.x and won’t get updates to ICS let alone Jelly Bean. I’m interested to see from a statistical point of view as to how many 1st time Android buyers go out and buy another or recontract another Android phone. From my own circle of friends, colleagues and acquaintances, I see most people try it once then move to something else.

      I love the platform, as a power user though it seems I’m forever tweaking or finding an app that won’t crash or drain the battery in an hour (Facebook do you hear!!!). I know a lot of people around my circles don’t want anything to do with that level of managing their mobile phone.

  • Matt

    A worthless statistic really, how many are decent Android devices? Not the $99 and $149 rubbish from the local BP servo. Blackberry and iOS dont make these crappy cheap Nanna devices so these numbers dont mean anything…

    • dazweeja

      It’s not a worthless statistic. It translates indirectly into the number of developers for the platform which feeds into app quality and availability. Most Android apps are written for Android 2.2 and above so even these cheap devices are important in this regard. The quality of apps in the App Store is the only factor I see that iOS currently has over Android.

    • Tim

      I guess the same could be said about those still buying iphone 3GS and 4. And the old versions of Blackberry that are being discounted. It’s a snapshot that no doubt we will have another nextweek outlining how iOS smashes everyone.

  • http://profiles.google.com/ballzingski Stephen Crisafulli

    I do my best to boost these numbers, been carrying two Android phones for three years now. One with a work sim :)

  • aryonoco

    I find these numbers very hard to believe.

    Sure, RIM is bleeding and all, but surely it has more than 0.1 marketshare.

    Also, of course Symbian has lost a lot of their market, but I still see a lot of Nokia E63 and E71s in the hands of adolescents. Again, I would think that Nokia still commands more than a 3.8% share of the market.

    Anyway, I would like to know how they have gathered their data and how they are calculating their numbers.

    • Max Hobbs

      .. thought it was analysis of new sales? (which explains why it doesn’t represent the current state of hand me downs and legacy RIM devices) Keep in mind, as well, that it’s an analysis of “smartphones”, which means that the phone that you bought for your grandma with the big buttons running series40 isn’t being shown.

      • Chris

        No not smart phones, all phones and whatever OS they may run on.

      • Max Hobbs

        Check the source mate.

    • Boars

      I don’t find it that hard to believe… in the company I work for Blackberries used to be the go to phone for the directors and such… now none of them want one. I don’t work for a small company either.

      Outside of work, I don’t think I’ve met more than one person who actually bought a blackberry for personal use… since I became aware of the existence of them. :S It’s also worth mentioning he moved onto an iphone.

      As for Nokia, once again I don’t know a single person who bought one of their non windows7 phones. They’ll have lost some fanboys no doubt, some may have transitiond to win7, others to android. It’s hard to get a clear snapshot of nokia from that table tho. I mean they’ll have some sales in Other & Win7 also.

      Either way, this is just sales, there’s probably a whole bunch of nokia users who don’t want to go to win7 and haven’t bothered to upgrade yet.

      Of course, my personal experiences are no indication of a the wider community but yeah… it’s also worth checking out the actual source article/PDF. It’s not quite as dire in other regions. Well, they’re still bleeding a TONNE of sales but still sold quite a lot of devices in other regions. That goes for RIM too.

    • Chris

      We are talking new purchases here, not existing phones.