Saturday , October 21 2017

Ice Cream Sandwich now on 4.9% of devices


The most recent update from the Android Developers dashboard shows an increase in devices running Ice Cream Sandwich which access the Google Play Store has risen from 2.9% last month to 4.9%. Probably due in part to Samsungs continued rollout of 4.0.3 to it’s Galaxy S II line of phones and also the recent release of the HTC One X with their One S model soon to ship with Ice Cream Sandwich soon. The Huawei P1 will also launch this month running Ice Cream Sandwich, Huawei have traditionally been very aggressive on price point so hopefully we’ll see adoption of this phone as well by the mass market.

The number of devices running Gingerbread devices still continues to grow but appears to be slowing albeit at a gradual rate. Devices running Froyo(2.2) and Eclair(2.1) versions of Android both showed drops in usage however devices running Donut(1.6) remain static as did Honeycomb(3.0-3.2) devices, which goes to show that manufacturers really need to take a leaf out of Asus’s book and start updating their tablets.

So it’s a slow increase for Ice Cream Sandwich adoption but it is increasing although a little too slowly for most people’s liking. Maybe today’s update to Ice Cream Sandwich for Vodafone/3 Galaxy S II owners will bump up the stats a little, although I think the phrase ‘blip on the radar’ applies here. Question for you guys, do you retire your older phone/tablet when you upgrade or do you tend to pass it on to someone else?

 
Source: Android Devs.

Daniel Tyson   Editor

Dan is a die-hard Android fan. Some might even call him a lunatic. He's been an Android user since Android was a thing, and if there's a phone that's run Android, chances are he owns it (his Nexus collection is second-to-none) or has used it.

Dan's dedication to Ausdroid is without question, and he has represented us at some of the biggest international events in our industry including Google I/O, Mobile World Congress, CES and IFA.

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9 Comments on "Ice Cream Sandwich now on 4.9% of devices"

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Williams Elera
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Williams Elera
It looks like Australia is going to be the last country in the world to receive the ICS update 4.0.4 for our unlocked generic Galaxy Note SimCard free GT-N7000. As unfortunately someone from an Allphones Store in Sydney told me, Australia would be last because were a very small market for Samsung… Now how can we change this poor mentality from Samsung towards Australian customers?. Here is the solution: If you are one of many australian customers who have bought an outright Galaxy Note GT-N7000 and are waiting and waiting for ICS update 4.0.4 here in Australia, then ring, email… Read more »
AMANDA
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AMANDA

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Brian Hislop
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I usually try to sell my old phone when I buy a new one. If you can try not to hold on to a phone for more than 12 months it’s usually still possible to get a decent return.

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I’m still on my first Android device but I imagine when I upgrade, I might keep it as a spare and tinker with it.
I wonder if they count custom ICS as part of the above figure?

Dave
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Dave

When, oh when will my Galaxy Note get ICS? 🙁

MrJT
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MrJT

I kept my HTC Desire after getting a GNex, might use it as a wifi hotspots.
Pro tip: always keep your last phone as less and less retailers / telcos will give you a lone phone if yours needs a service or warranty repair.

Carbs
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Carbs

 I had/have the same phones and I keep my Desire (its has ICS also) to use as a VoIP phone around the house, portable audio when I’m out in the yard… and for a month needed to use it as a phone again thanks to my Galaxy Nexus breaking (USB port fault), so we handy that I kept it.

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