Saturday , October 21 2017

Nvidia announce the Tegra X1 – a mobile ‘Superchip’ with 64-bit Octa-core processing and 256 GPUs

Nvidia Tegra X1
Nvidia is really moving when it comes to mobile processing. Their Tegra K1 processor powers the latest Nexus 9 hardware showing off 64-bit computing on Android and today at CES, Nvidia has shown off the latest in their mobile processing arsenal announcing the Tegra X1.

While the K1 was based on Kepler architecture, the Tegra X1 is based on the newer Maxwell architecture. The whole architecture allows for a boost in computing power, the Tegra X1 has 256 GPU cores, as well as a 64-bit Octa-core CPU, this boost in computing power also allows them to compute up to a teraflop of information, as well as being able to handle 10-bit video in H.265/VP9

While it provides a lot more processing power, the Nvidia Tegra X1 also offers improved power efficiency as well. NVidia is claiming that the Tegra X1 will be twice as efficient as the Tegra K1 – at least according to GFXBench 3.0 benchmarks.

The availability for the Tegra X1 has not yet been announced.
Developing…

 
Source: Nvidia.

Daniel Tyson   Editor

Dan is a die-hard Android fan. Some might even call him a lunatic. He's been an Android user since Android was a thing, and if there's a phone that's run Android, chances are he owns it (his Nexus collection is second-to-none) or has used it.

Dan's dedication to Ausdroid is without question, and he has represented us at some of the biggest international events in our industry including Google I/O, Mobile World Congress, CES and IFA.

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1 Comment on "Nvidia announce the Tegra X1 – a mobile ‘Superchip’ with 64-bit Octa-core processing and 256 GPUs"

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Beredan
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Beredan

I want this in a device similar to a raspberry pi so I can finally leverage 10bit!

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