Saturday , December 15 2018 Ausdroid » Software » Apps, Games & Google Services » Google Play Music now lets you store 50,000 tracks in the cloud

play-50000-tracks

Google has increased Play Music’s storage for users to 50,000 tracks, with a friendly “Encore! Encore!” message displayed to users logging in on the desktop/web interface today. The message is curiously absent from the app (whoops), and someone should probably tell Google that an “encore” involves repeating something rather than a new one. Still…

Since Play Music launched a few years ago, the limit has been 20,000 tracks – not something many of us hit, but clearly there’s enough people who kicked up a fuss about it that Google’s seem fit to increase it.

The new storage limit applies to all Play Music accounts, paid or otherwise. If you haven’t started using Google Play Music to store your own tracks, maybe now’s the time to start!

Source: Engadget.

Alex Dennis   Journalist

By day, Alex works within the Industrial Relations field/occupation but by night and in his spare down time he searches the net for anything and everything relating to Android and Chrome related products and news.

Other various interests Alex has include, Accessible transport for people with disabilities along with LGBTIQ and Health related fields and interests for again for people with disabilities.

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Adam
Ausdroid Reader

I’m still an iTunes user on my Mac at home, although more as a music manager than a source of actually buying music. There are several things stopping me using Google Play Music: 1) my wife still uses an iPhone, so iTunes will still need to be used for that and I really don’t want to use two different music environments; 2) I assume that any music I’ve purchased in iTunes would need to be re-purchased if I switched to Google Play; 3) Data allowances in Australia aren’t enough (and data connections inadequate outside of state capitals) to use music… Read more »

deanomalino
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deanomalino

Well you could upload all the music you purchased from iTunes to this 50,000 cloud storage thing?

Wayne Moore
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Yes. I have music purchased and ripped from all over the place and have it all nice and neatly stored in Google Play. I installed the music uploader app on my wife’s laptop and now she has the same collection. If one of us purchases more music, it gets downloaded into a shared location (a drive on my server at home), then uploaded into the other’s Google Play account. Easy. It also means that if we change phones, tablets or computers, we never have to worry about moving any music across. PS I just logged into my account and got… Read more »

Adam
Ausdroid Reader

Does this actually work though? What about iTunes restrictions on non Apple devices (not that I have that many tracks actually purchased from iTunes)?

deanomalino
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deanomalino

Pretty sure you can download the purchased tracks from iTunes to your computer then you can do whatever you like with them? Not sure if they’ve changed that recently since I haven’t used it in a while. 😛

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
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( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

I have pretty shocking internet where I live and I still use all access with absolute ease.

Philip Clark
Ausdroid Reader

Data’s not an issue if you just download/”pin” tracks while on a wifi network, you can then listen to whatever you can fit on your phone without using any data. I like the convenience of looking up whatever I feel like listening to though, so I pay $90/m for a 4gb data allowance. Worth it for me!

Pierre
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Pierre

“Encore” means “more” in French. Google has used it correctly

Myk Dowling
Ausdroid Reader

And its general use at the end of a concert is to call for another tune, not a repeat. Completely correct usage.

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