Saturday , February 17 2018

Android distribution numbers released – Marshmallow doubles its market share

Screenshot 2016-04-06 at 6.28.09 AM
It’s that time of the month again, Google has released the data which shows what versions of Android have been hitting the Play store over the last few days.

The results show that Marshmallow is moving along, doubling market share from 2.3% to 4.6% last year, capitalising on the release of the Android 6.0 running Galaxy S7 line and the very recently released LG G5 in the US. While Froyo and Gingerbread remained static, all other versions of Android dropped in market share except for Android 5.1 which saw a miniscule 0.2% increase in market share, climbing to 19.4%.

As usual, here’s a comparison to last months numbers:

Android Version March April
Android 2.2 (Froyo) 0.1% 0.1%
Android 2.3.3 – 2.3.7 (Gingerbread) 2.6% 2.6%
Android 4.0.3 – 4.0.4 (Ice Cream Sandwich) 2.3% 2.2%
Android 4.1.x (JellyBean) 8.1% 7.8%
Android 4.2.x (JellyBean) 11.0% 10.5%
Android 4.3 (JellyBean) 3.2% 3.0%
Android 4.4 (KitKat) 34.3% 33.4%
Android 5.0 (Lollipop) 16.9% 16.4%
Android 5.1 (Lollipop) 19.2% 19.4%
Android 6.0 (Marshmallow) 2.3% 4.6%
Source: Android Developer Dashboard.

Daniel Tyson   Editor

Dan is a die-hard Android fan. Some might even call him a lunatic. He's been an Android user since Android was a thing, and if there's a phone that's run Android, chances are he owns it (his Nexus collection is second-to-none) or has used it.

Dan's dedication to Ausdroid is without question, and he has represented us at some of the biggest international events in our industry including Google I/O, Mobile World Congress, CES and IFA.

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1 Comment on "Android distribution numbers released – Marshmallow doubles its market share"

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mrjayviper
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mrjayviper

ONLY 4+% after 6 months….

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