Wednesday , October 18 2017

Only about 18% of you are going to buy a Google Pixel … why?

pixel-box-front

After the Pixel announcement early on Wednesday morning, we ran a bit of a poll on Ausdroid to gauge your interest in Google’s newly announced phones. Overwhelmingly, you’ve told us that you just aren’t really interested. Just 18% are committed to buying a phone based on what you’ve seen so far, with a further 29% undecided … however more than 52% have said no, just not interested.

We’ve been discussing this quite a bit, actually, but not for the reason you think.

In fact, we’re surprised that it’s only 52% that have said no.

What’s wrong with the Pixel line-up?

First and foremost, the feedback is the price. With Google’s Pixel phones varying in price from $1,079 for the smaller size and 32GB storage all the way up to $1,419 for the larger size, 128GB storage, there’s little doubt that the Pixel line simply won’t be priced like the Nexus line was. We know this, or should’ve … Pixel has been, since it was incepted, Google’s premium showcase. Nexus showed off the best of Android, and as Google’s own execs say, Pixel shows off the best of Google. It’s a notch above.

This is quite a departure from the Nexus model, where premium wasn’t really the focus, and building a phone showing what Android could do was. It just so happened that this worked out to be a bit more affordable, with Nexus phones starting life significantly less expensive, though with last year’s Nexus 5X and Nexus 6P, the price was starting to jump quite a bit.

Nexus comparisons aside, which probably aren’t all that fair, the pricing of the Pixel range is in keeping with what we’ve come to expect in 2016 from a premium handset. Apple’s iPhone 7 range tops out at $1,379 (though you do get 256GB of storage at that price). Samsung’s Galaxy S7 Edge is priced at $1,249 at the moment, with 32GB of storage. The slightly smaller Galaxy S7 is $1,149 now, though both it at its larger brother were a bit pricier at launch.

Even this little analysis paints us a bit of a picture. At $1,419, the Pixel XL 128GB is $40 more expensive than Apple’s iPhone 7 with 256GB of storage. What’s going on there?

Apple’s iPhone line is ten years old next year. Samsung’s Galaxy S line is six years old this year. These brands have been around for a number of years, and have — over time — built up quite an expertise in developing premium, highly desirable phones, and though there might be some argument, I would say they’ve built a reputation that allows them to charge a premium for their products.

Google’s Pixel line is much younger. The Pixel line’s dabble in mobile phones is younger still; in fact, it was only announced last week. To launch a brand new phone, with no pedigree, at a price point beyond what both Samsung and Apple are charging for their established, premium brands … I think it’s understandable that Google has got a few of you off side.

What’s the effect of that price?

The first and most obvious effect is that would-be customers will simply turn away. You’ve told us as much.

We’re in October, a time of year where – based on history – there aren’t many more announcements to be made until the beginning of next year. Many phone customers, especially those who buy premium, may have invested only a few months ago when the premium phones announced at Mobile World Congress made their way onto shelves. They might well choose to wait a few months until February 2017 to see what’s coming next.

Those who come from a Nexus buying background might too be holding on to their phones from last year, but they have the added disincentive of price disparity; something that customers used to Samsung and Apple prices might already be comfortable with. For these customers, the Pixel line becomes even less attractive.

Even your die-hard Android aficionados — like us — aren’t entirely sure that the investment will be made. From a quick internal discussion, Dan will buy one, and is likely to get a second, and I’m likely to get just the one, but for many of the rest, the value proposition doesn’t match the price.

Are they premium enough to justify the price, though?

This is the challenging part. No one outside of Google has had much time with the Pixel phones yet. Phones aren’t in the hands of reviewers … we’ve been told this will happen some time before the 20 October retail availability, but not by much. The only impressions out there are what limited people have formed from hands-on time with the Pixels at launch events, and those aren’t great environments to form considered opinions.

However, early impressions are very positive. Jason, Duncan and I were of mostly the same mind after comparing notes. The Pixel phones feel amazing. They’re beyond buttery smooth; they’re lightning quick. The build is virtually unimpeachable. The camera software is still decidedly Google, but it’s also very good, and the camera performance is beyond anything we’ve seen in a Nexus phone before, and beyond what we’ve seen in most of 2016’s top-shelf smartphones too. For the last couple of years, Apple and Samsung have definitely led the field in camera performance, but the Pixel could — on first, brief impressions — easily beat them.

There’s more to the value proposition than how they feel and how they work, though. Phones from Google (including the former Nexus line, and these Pixels) will receive software updates before anyone else, by many months in some cases. If you like to be ahead of the pack, and receive security updates very quickly, the Pixel is the best way to do that in Android.

There’s also the other things we know about — the best of Google, as they say. Unlimited photo storage, access to and integration with Google’s new and developing products, etc. I don’t need to go into detail, because you’ve read it, and we all know it, and while there’s some value in all this, it’s not the decision point for most of us.

Where does this leave us?

To my mind, without having conducted a full review, there’s every suggestion that the Pixel line deserves premium pricing. The question in my mind is whether it deserves pricing beyond what everyone else is doing, while — ostensibly — not offering as much. iPhone 7 doubles the storage for less coin. Samsung S7 offers less storage, but for two hundred dollars less, from a more established brand of smartphone.

Are we surprised that only 18% of Ausdroid readers who answered are interested in buying? Not really. Are we surprised that 52% have already decided against? A little.

Without knowing more, and without gaining that knowledge from a full review, and reading the reviews of others, it’s too hard to say — on paper — that the Pixel line represents good value. I have a sneaking suspicion that a review will bring this out, and some will be changing their minds. Will we see significantly more than 18% deciding to buy, though?

What are your thoughts on all this?

 

Chris Rowland   Editor and Publisher

Chris publishes one of Australia's most popular technology websites, Ausdroid. His interests include mobile (of course), as well as connected technology and how it can make all our lives easier.

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163 Comments on "Only about 18% of you are going to buy a Google Pixel … why?"

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kevin
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kevin
Who in their right mind (in the Android universe) would buy a Pixel? I’m sorry, but the whole concept is ridiculous. Where top end smart phones are disappearing and the bottom end (or is that mid range) Chinese phones are out there for $300 how could anyone even bother to read the Pixel blurb. Google had a chance to capture a large share of the market (even their rebranded Nexus Phone were overpriced, but not so idiotically) with a, say $400 or less starting price. They chose to triple that. I am absolutely gob-smacked and the device, whilst in and… Read more »
Jerry B
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Jerry B
Since the Note 8 will not be out by the time my contract expires, I will be deciding between just sticking with my old phone and and prepaying until its release… or going with Iphone. Pixel automatically gets excluded in my books because of their outrageous pricing here in Australia, not to mention their average design. Could Google seriously not come up with something that atleast looks half way premium? I get it, phones are pretty much just little shiny rectangles now, but one of the biggest companies in the world coming up with a dated design and nothing really… Read more »
Con Liaros
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Con Liaros

Can you purchase the phone in the USA and bring it to Australia (i.e. is there in difference between the US model and the Australian model)? I will be in the USA in December, and could save $200 if they are the same phone.

Fred
Valued Guest
Fred

Bands are different

LTE band 1(2100), 2(1900), 3(1800), 4(1700/2100), 5(850), 7(2600), 8(900), 12(700), 13(700), 17(700), 18(800), 19(800), 20(800), 21(1500), 26(850), 28(700), 32(1500), 38(2600), 39(1900), 40(2300), 41(2500) – Global
vs
LTE band 1(2100), 2(1900), 3(1800), 4(1700/2100), 5(850), 7(2600), 8(900), 12(700), 13(700), 17(700), 20(800), 25(1900), 26(850), 28(700), 29(700), 30(2300), 41(2500) – USA

however most of these don’t count. It’s only really band 40 and Canberra (where it’s used a lot) that matters, and then only on Optus.

Con Liaros
Valued Guest
Con Liaros

Thanks. So the phone you buy in USA is different to the phone you buy in Australia?

Shoo Shoebridge
Valued Guest
Shoo Shoebridge

AUD1,419 for the Pixel XL 128GB is USD1077 at today’s exchange rates. That makes it 32% more expensive to buy in Australia than in the US. Our 10% GST can’t explain that big a difference, and shows Google’s treating Australian customers just as poorly as Apple has. A real pity, as I’d be keen to buy the XL at a more reasonable price.

Vargralor
Valued Guest
Vargralor

I’d grab one if they were available through Optus but Telstra’s plans are just too little value for Android users in this day and age. Data free media streaming is a must on a flagship phone these days, especially with so much of the phone focus being on media usage.

Nizar Noor
Valued Guest

I preordered mine, from the Google store. If they’re going to release a new Pixel lineup next year, they’ll need better timing (perhaps around the same time as iPhone, or Galaxy S).

I’m glad Google finally put a premium face on Android themselves. I hope this will be a success.

(BTW, it’s so hard to find screen protectors/cases here! Any tips?)

Stephen Reeves
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Stephen Reeves

I’m gonna get one, now that the Note7 is probably not gonna sell…

Member

I’d actually be quite happy to get the XL. However just not with Telstra. I’m quite happy with Optus and if they’d offered it, I’d have signed up.

Maybe next year they won’t do a carrier exclusive and I’d consider getting it.

77martians
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77martians

I need a new phone and I can only consider the pixel since I value software updates and as for Android phones it has only been the Nexus and now it’s the Pixel that get that. Too expensive yes but at the same time I’m happy to get a phone that looks more premium than the previous Nexus phones. It’s not like anyone has been particular interested in what phone I have using when putting my now old Nexus 5 on the table.

Dave
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Dave

OnePlus3?

77martians
Valued Guest
77martians

That is actually a really good option you are suggesting. A tad to big for my taste though. Besides Google has caught my attention with the pixels camera.

Raph Even-Chaim
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Raph Even-Chaim

I’ve purchased pretty much every nexus device since the Galaxy Nexus, and absolutely loved the pure Android experience. The Pixel is the phone I want, albeit at a price point that I am balking at a little.

32GB probably big enough, 128GB too big for my needs… I am really hoping this isnt a misfire. Reviews and discussions pending, I suspect even though i think its about $200 over priced, I will grab one on the 20th if i can find somewhere to buy it.

Member
It’s not about specs. It’s simply about their being no justification for that price. I’m an Android and Google fan boy through and through. I’ve bought every Nexus other than the first. I love Vanilla Android and being first to get updates yet this is the first year I haven’t pulled the trigger instantly. The price of Nexus has never been a factor for me. But if Google is going to charge Apple prices they’d better offer the same as Apple. Retail stores = Fail. Genius bar = Fail. Stellar record for on the spot device replacement = Fail. Major… Read more »
montalbert_scott
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montalbert_scott

I agree totally. They don’t see that unless they offer the same as Apple they can’t and shouldn’t charge the same. The big one is support. But something in the phone that sets it apart hardware wise from the rest would be nice (aside from an ai that frankly most people will rarely use)

Member
Luke Vesty

You sound like a scorned Nexus fan. Not an Android fan.

I’ve been a long time Nexus user too. For years. But the Pixel is the phone I’ve wanted Google to make for years. It’s a dream come true for this nerd.

GregAndo
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GregAndo

I am interested – what is it, over the 6P, that is a dream come true for you?

Member
Luke Vesty
For one, it’s a premium device that isn’t enormous. The 6P was great but just way too big for my liking. Also, the 6P had known issues with Telstra’s network which I simply wasn’t prepared to put up with/risk. I even asked Telstra reps in person about this and they straight up told me there were fundamental issues with the 6P and their 4G network, hence why Telstra only carried the 5X. Huawei even ended up having to develop a custom firmware with Google to improve performance on Telstra’s network, I believe. I prefer the clean design of the Pixel… Read more »
GregAndo
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GregAndo

Okay I think I understand. Ignoring network issues which could still be a problem with let’s say Optus this time, what I think you mean is you did think the 6P was worth $1500. So you would have paid that for a 5P, if it had existed last year?

Member
Luke Vesty

Yeah, probably! I was ready to upgrade my Nexus 5 last year but the 6P was too large and the 5X wasn’t a big enough upgrade over what I already had.

Akshay Sharma
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Akshay Sharma
I’ve been a Nexus user since the Galaxy Nexus and felt I had to stretch last time for the Huawei 6P. This time with the “no 64GB” trick, Google wants me to part with $1,419 for my current 6P equivalent.. I never pay extra for the ‘label’, be it clothes or tech and I felt the Nexus line had maintained that value proposition. The Pixel is asking me to pay extra for the “brand” and that’s not going to happen. My read of the Google Assistant is that it is going to be device agnostic and it will be a… Read more »
Member
Luke Vesty

You’re not just paying for the brand. You’re paying for arguably the best all round Android phone. Best value? No. Best quality? Yes. Buy hey, if you have a 6P you’re really not due for an upgrade anyway.

I’ve already listed all the killer specs and features elsewhere in this thread. The Pixel is Google premium. It’s never been done before.

Shoo Shoebridge
Valued Guest
Shoo Shoebridge

It’s not just Google premium, they’re charging an Australia premium just like Apple. I’ve had Nexus, Moto X and now OnePlus3 and I too have long wished for Google to make a premium, sexy phone. They have, but they’re being unreasonable with price. I’d be happy to pay the same as US customers, just not an extra $200 for no justification.

Akshay Sharma
Valued Guest
Akshay Sharma
I upgrade to the new Nexus every year so I’m due! 😁 I don’t think the iPhone is worth ~ $1,500 in the same vein. There is a bit of paying for the brand here. Paying for the perception of quality. There are phones at half the price that will match these spec for spec. The Note 7 (pardon the explosions) is around the $1250 mark. The S7 Edge is getting closer to $1,000 now. So, just saying that the Pixel is premium doesn’t cut it. That said, I’m fairly certain that JB is going to be adjusting the price… Read more »
montalbert_scott
Valued Guest
montalbert_scott

Me too. That is definitely my plan

Member
Luke Vesty

I suspect Google will dictate the cost. The moment you drop the price is the moment the prestige label falls away. Google isn’t interested in rapid fire sales straight off the bat. They want to establish the Pixel as a premium brand.

Mark my words. The price of the Pixel won’t budge until the Pixel 2 launches.

Chris
Valued Guest
I’ve somehow prompted a very, very rigorous discussion here, and I’m very happy to see it. Reading your thoughts and arguments has been very informative. There are some very interesting points coming out of this; that we should consider a phone as being more than merely the sum of its parts (technical brilliance does not lead to a great phone .. we’ve seen that many times), that carrier exclusives aren’t ideal (we saw Moto have a really bad experience with that last year), and even some well made arguments about how Apple better justifies the premium price (with longer tail… Read more »
Andrew
Valued Guest
Andrew

It’s a very passionate topic with some really good points raised by people. It’s a discussion that could go on and on honestly.

The only way to know if this product is good is to wait for reviews (looking forward to Ausdroid’s review) and to see if the strategy is good is to find out of they’re popular in the market.

Right now it’s all a kerfuffle with initial emotional reactions.

montalbert_scott
Valued Guest
montalbert_scott

True. The proof will be in the pudding in a few months time… Let’s wait and see sales figures

Member
Luke Vesty

I doubt Google will release initial sales figures, especially given that Apple doesn’t release them for the iPhone anymore. And even over a year there’s no possible way it’ll come close to the iPhone. Google is playing the long game here. You can’t establish a premium product and a legion of fans overnight.

Andrew
Valued Guest
Andrew
The problem I see with android fans is that they determine the ‘value’ of a smartphone purely based on specs. If a phone has A, B, C, D then it’s valued at X. If it only has A, B and C, then it should be valued lower than X. This type of thinking I think is the problem with Android and Android fans on the internet. There’s no value given to the phone as an experience on a whole. Phones are not and should not be valued just as sum of its parts, but more than that – just look… Read more »
Member
I completely agree about the Apple overall support behind the iPhone. It is a big factor in why people keep buying them. A really good example is how easy it is to change iPhone handsets. Plug into your computer, sync with iTunes and select the backup of your previous handset and bam, your new phone is set up exactly as your old one was, including ALL app data. I love my Nexus handset, and cannot see myself ever going back to an iPhone. However, the area of data back up and transfer to new handsets is one small example of… Read more »
Member
Luke Vesty

100% this. Well, 99%. I’d die if I was forced to use an iPhone for work.

Member
Valid points and a good argument. I buy alot of phones – and the one thing that sets many phones apart from others in the $1000+ range is local support/service. This is valued higher than anything by your ‘typical’ [iPhone type of] consumer. Walk into an apple or samsung store and get an issue or phone replaced, sometimes instantly. This is worth more than any tangible spec, or feature. If Google can do the same, then I’ll pay the same for that phone. They weren’t able to with previous nexus, as it wasn’t their product. Now the Pixel is. But… Read more »
Brendan Adams
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Brendan Adams

I think this whole thing is over thought.
A lot of people buy phones because of one or multiple overlying reasons:
1) They want to stand out and have something different from the herd.
2) They want what everyone else has
3) They are fanboys
4) Specs for bragging rights
5) Specs for work / productivity
6) Cheap convenience
7) reliability / warranty (to a small degree software upgrades)

I just don’t see the Pixel as a phone that appeals to any of these things differently than the many other phones out there.

Member
Luke Vesty

They have 24/7 in-phone support though.

montalbert_scott
Valued Guest
montalbert_scott

That doesn’t replace a faulty phone. We’ll have to see how they do it but when I had 6p issues I was told if it was after 2weeks old I’d have to go thru Google not thru the local store I bought it… That isn’t good enough for a premium price and product.

Member
Luke Vesty

We’ll just have to wait and see what Google’s plans are. The best plan for Google is don’t build a faulty phone!

Member

Or as a consumer, don’t crack the glass front screen (or back) on the pixel.

Member
Luke Vesty

I have to admit I’m worried about dropping it. Especially as cases weren’t even available for preorder in Australia the day I made my Pixel order.

Member

Cases and screen protectors have been hard to come by from suppliers as well. I think there will a lack of cases for about 2 weeks after launch. Not good as that is what most people look for immediately after making a phone purchase.

Member
Luke Vesty

I almost wonder whether Google wants this. It’ll mean their phone will be easier to spot in the wild in the days following its launch. It’ll get noticed with its distinctive back.

Member

It’s actually a negative affect from a consumer standpoint.
People really want case choice. I doubt jbhifi and telstra will even stock Google cases let alone other brands.
Check any jbhifi atm. If it’s not Apple, you can’t get accessories. Even for the exclusive oppo brand they stock. Customers hate it.

Member
Luke Vesty

Yeah it’s friggen annoying. Hopefully Google, with their exclusive deal with JB and Telstra, has managed to convince them to stock accessories as well. We’ll see.

Member

Yeah hopefully that’ll work. i just know that JB is the exclusive on the Oppo now that DickSmith is gone – good luck finding an oppo case in a JB store.

Brad H.
Valued Guest
They’re ugly as sin and it’s not clean Android anymore. I could and would have paid the asking price if it was attractive and running clean Android. Price was only a very small part of my reaction. The phone is one of the most boring and uninspired designs I’ve ever seen, and I’ll go as far as to even call it ugly. You can have all the premium hardware in it you want, but if you’re going for a mainstream audience, design sells more than hardware. Apple will tell you that. I can’t see this being a success for Google… Read more »
Nizar Noor
Valued Guest

I think the Android makers have decided this is the new clean Android.

Member
Luke Vesty
For years the iPhone has been considered THE premium smart phone despite relatively low resolution screens, LCD display technology, no waterproofing or stereo speakers (until the iPhone 7), “large” bezels, small amounts of RAM, no external storage, small batteries, etc. And yet it has always, ALWAYS worn the “premium” badge in the smart phone market place. Why? Because a list of specs doesn’t define a user experience. It’s just one side of the equation. So now Google has entered the high end arena with its Pixel. It has its own set of compromises AND its own set of high end… Read more »
Chris
Valued Guest

I’m in the same boat. I’ll be buying one.

I just think they’re taking a somewhat risky strategy pricing at the premium without that device heritage behind them.

who
Valued Guest
Its nothing to do with heritage. You are getting significantly less value out of your dollar. This can apply to other “premium” android devices as well Comparing to Apple you arent getting retail presence, genius bar, on the spot replacements, instore training, an excellent custom SoC design, NVMe storage, on time updates for up to 5 years and GST included in the online price (I could go on here) If Samsung, HTC, Sony, Huawei or whoever offered what the pixel is at its price I’m sure most would still be unhappy even though they have “heritage” and brand loyalists Also… Read more »
Member
Luke Vesty

For every feature Apple has that Google doesn’t, Google has something that Apple doesn’t.

Member
Luke Vesty
Perhaps, but that’s what they did with the Nexus line which never gained any mainstream traction. Ok, it was never really marketed but I think there’s a lot to be said of how people perceive “affordable” consumer goods. Irrespective of how good the Nexus line was for its price, people generally equate a higher cost with a better product (even though this is largely irrational). If Google priced the Pixel below the iPhone in the high end category people would (rightly or wrongly) assume it to be inferior. Part of what makes the premium category premium is the status element… Read more »
BaldwinP
Valued Guest
BaldwinP
Price. Carrier (which is effectively an add-on to the price). More than anything, a lack of features for the premium apart from Google Assistant. And as for that, I have had my time of early adoption of Google features, thankfully didn’t do so for Google Glass and won’t do it now for Google Assistant. Let other people beta test it, I’ll get it on a less expensive phone in a couple of years when it works better. I also prefer a slimmer form factor (and have been a Sony customer for years as a result), it’s quite funny to me… Read more »
Member

It’s not the price, it’s the perceived value. And the perceived value of the Pixel looks poor.

Though I am warming to it. If the reviews agree that the experience is awesome, then I’ll be in.

Member
Matt
Price and carrier exclusivity. Well done Google. If I could get it from Optus with MRP then I ‘might’. If I have to get it with Telstra or buy it outright then I 100% wont. There’s nothing terribly wrong with my 6P but I am irritated by the jankiness on a daily basis. I know this will be contested by an army of 6P owners but I can only say what I see on my phone and the thing must throttle a lot. The pixel might only be using a 821 but from watching videos it looks extremely snappy. I… Read more »
Member

This. Pretty much sums me up. Just put GS6 in for 6p and you have what I was going to write.

bids
Valued Guest
bids

My 6p was slowing down alot I factory reset it and now it’s blazing fast again

Member

Well, the look of the phone doesn’t appeal to me plus I’ve already got the LG G5 for under $500 a month ago and so far very happy with it.

David Anderton
Valued Guest
David Anderton

Exactly the same boat. The only thing I’m missing from my Nexus is the ability to get rid of a couple of the lg apps and i want to be able to take photo spheres that’s it.

Jay
Valued Guest

It will be interesting to see the take up here. Android market-wise I believe Samsung has a significant advantage. I can’t see a late year Pixel launch having a significant inroad, only a month after the iPhone and Note 7, and given that undoubtedly there’ll be an S8 early next year.

Member
Luke Vesty

The fact that Samsung is in major damage control at the moment could see a number of customers try the Pixel.

Member
Forgetting about price for a moment, I honestly don’t think the feature set or style is there. Price doesn’t really concern me if I really want something. But lack of features definitely do. – water resistance – large footprint vs screen size – no expandable storage (android has it baked in, why not support it??) – low resolution on the Pixel – I know it doesn’t matter day to day, but it does ALOT for VR. – no wireless charging (not a biggy but I like it, alot) – lack of local support/repair centres. If you buy from google, great.… Read more »
Strand
Valued Guest
Strand

$$$

If it was Nexus 4 or 5 pricing, I’d pick one up as a partner for my iPhone 7, but $1200 is too spicy a meatball.

GregAndo
Valued Guest
GregAndo
For me it is mostly a screen size issue. 5.5″ less the nav bar real estate, is too small for me to go. I already downgraded from my Xperia Z Ultra 6.44″ to the Nexus 6 5.95″. It was more manageable as a result, but I have had no issue with this form factor. I have found that 5.7″ to the 6P was disappointing, but 5.7″ to the Note 7 is acceptable and still quite nice thanks to the off screen nav buttons. iPhone Plus at 5.5″ is similarly disappointing to the 6P. I would begrudgingly go down to either… Read more »
TT
Valued Guest

Anyway still better than Samsung’s phone, at least pixel won’t exploded. I told all my friends don’t buy Samsung’s products.

GregAndo
Valued Guest
GregAndo

What proof do you have that the Pixels won’t catch fire? There is absolutely no way you can make that comment truthfully. To tell people not to buy a companies products because of a battery manufacturing fault (in one product that the company is replacing for brand new devices) is incredibly bad advice to give. I feel sorry for those that have accepted your advice. Most who have the device do not share your views.

Member
Luke Vesty

We don’t have proof the Pixel will catch on fire. But we do have proof the Galaxy Note 7 has.

TT
Valued Guest

Do you have brain or IQ? Samsung told you because of battery then you believe? They told consumers in China they use different battery factory but they exploded again. The main problem is because of main board. I am so sorry for your IQ.

GregAndo
Valued Guest
GregAndo

You addressed none of the points I made. I definitely don’t believe your word over Samsung’s.

Paul Walker
Valued Guest
Paul Walker
For me, it’s purely a price issue. I have a now very old Nexus 5 in desperate need of updating. I was hanging out for the Pixel and then disappointed by the price. I always buy my phones outright and this price is simply out of my league. I want a 64GB phone at least 5.5″. Googles price for the entry level is high but for a phone of this spec, it’s just scary! Given price is clearly an issue for lots of people, perhaps an article outlining alternatives might be in order Ausroid? I’ve been looking phones like the… Read more »
David Anderton
Valued Guest
David Anderton

Get a lg g5 online. $550 and very happy coming from my Nexus 5

Member

If they were coming to the Vodafone network I may have considered it but no way I’m jumping to Telstra just for a phone.

Member

This as well. Their plans are laughable.

Member
Luke Vesty

Their network, even with their recent issues, is still the most reliable and has the best coverage. It’s true. You notice it when you go to rural and remote areas the most.

Member

That’s true. When I go rural Optus doesn’t cut it like my wife’s telstra SIM.
But nearly $100 for 3gb of data and a pixel (not xl) that’s the laughable part.

Member
Luke Vesty

Makes more sense to buy outright and go with a BYO plan. I pay $50 a month for 5gb and have ordered the Pixel direct from Google.

ripnexus
Valued Guest
ripnexus

$50 for 5gb SIM only. Even that’s a joke when competitors offer 9-11gb for the same price!

Member
Luke Vesty

On inferior networks.

Member
Dean Rosolen

The lack of Really Blue at launch, the price and the fact that my Nexus 5X isn’t EOL for system updates yet are pain points for me.

I may end up sticking with the 5X when all is said and done.

Member

One word, Telstra. I’d happily pay one off on a plan if it was through Optus, but I’m not shifting carriers to get a phone. If Google open up financing on the AU Google Store then yea sure I’ll get a 128gb XL.

Member
I’ve had 6 Nexus devices over the years but only bought my 6P fairly recently. I always buy outright rather than plan so the Nexus phones have made that relatively easy. But at a starting point of almost $1100, this is now out of my league. The phone looks fantastic and I’m sure will perform well but I can’t justify the expenditure. I certainly can’t justify getting locked into Telstra either. What is interesting is that for Nexus devices, Google worked with a partner and kept the price low. Now they control the whole gamut and the price has gone… Read more »
Member
Luke Vesty

Even if every Nexus user jumped to the iPhone tomorrow it would barely register a blip on a quarterly sales chart.

Member

My understanding is you can’t unlock bootloaders for carrier exclusive phones, Ie telstra and verizon(US). I think direct from google you still can (I think…)

Member
Luke Vesty

Average consumers have absolutely zero interest in unlocking their bootloader. This phone is not a developer play thing like a Nexus. It’s a device for the mainstream.

Member

I would certainly hope that’s worst case.

virduk
Valued Guest
virduk

Well for me its the simple fact that I already bought a phone this year. I’m not a frequent phone updater, I only upgrade when google updates stop.

Plus I’m not really convinced that this first Pixel phone is as ground up google as the prior pixel devices (such as the Chromebook Pixel) are.

So I figure another iteration and it will be more googly.

Member
Luke Vesty

I think you’re correct. If you’ve just bought a phone, wait for the Pixel 2 or 3. Absolutely.

Ross
Valued Guest
Ross

Telstra exclusive! Telstra is ridiculously expensive so I have no option to get the Pixel phone.
At my last contract Telstra was 40% more expensive than Vodafone.

Member

Just because only 18% of Ausdroid readers want a Pixel does not mean it will not be a success. This group is a subset of the population. The enthusiast knows a good mid range phone can do almost anything an expensive one can at half the price. I would never buy a phone that costs a thousand or more. There are many phones for under $500 that are just fine.

Member
Luke Vesty

Absolutely. Ausdroid is a wholly inaccurate reflection of the broader consumer market.

TT
Valued Guest

Yeah, I totally agree. I. Find in Android ecosystem people always use price to judge a phone. However in Apple ecosystem it is much better.

montalbert_scott
Valued Guest
montalbert_scott

I’m confused here mate. You say it doesn’t mean that it won’t be a success but your following comment points towards a big fat fail? Or are you saying that Joe public don’t know that mid range can be perfectly adequate?

Member

I am saying Joe Public neither knows nor cares. All they will go for is shiny and prestigious. Like Apple owners. So the Pixel could be a success if they push it hard with advertising. The AI assistant is interesting, but I will stick with OK Google. I think it will be a big fat fail amongst Ausdroid readers.

Member
Luke Vesty

I agree. By and large, the type of person who reads Ausdroid is not the type of person Google is targeting with the Pixel.

montalbert_scott
Valued Guest
montalbert_scott

As much as I’d like to believe it I find it a bit far fetched that we expect the general consumer to purchase a pixel when for the same price they can get a top of the line iPhone. I hope they do but I think Google have underestimated the iPhone pull and overestimated their brand in the market.

SachmoJoe
Valued Guest
SachmoJoe
Stated perfectly. I would love to make this my next phone, but the reality is I don’t pay more than say $600 for a phone outright (I’m not opposed to buying online from Asia – got my S6 for $580) and I’ll never again jump on an $80+ per month 2-year contract (currently spending $20 per month prepaid). So the average phone user at a Telstra (or Verizon in the US) will have the choice of a new iPhone or Galaxy, and the Pixel, which is something with zero brand cache. I think it’s pretty clear which way this is… Read more »
Member
Luke Vesty

But what about Samsung?

Square eyed
Valued Guest
Square eyed
I personally have just joined ausdroid to leave this comment. For me it’s the updates. iPhone offers 5+ years of updates for the same price where as Google only offers 2 year (excluding security updates which are 3 years). Basically I can hand my 2 year old iPhone to my children and it will still get updates for another 2 years when I again hand them my 2 year old iPhone. The iPhone my kids have can then still be given to my Mum and she can use it for 2 years fairly safely. By contrast I hand my 2… Read more »
Member
Luke Vesty

Something worth remembering is that a lot of Google features are updated outside of the OS. So while some like to quote Apple’s ongoing updates, you need to remember that far more of Android’s core functionality gets updated via the play store. This extends well beyond the time Google stops updating their OS specifically.

It’s also important to remember that many Apple OS updates omit features on older the hardware. It’s patently false to say an iPhone 5 will offer a like for like iPhone 7 experience after an update.

Member
Luke Vesty

The iPhone does not offer 5+ years of updates. Not only that, many of the updates you speak of gimp features or significantly impact on the performance of the phone.

Barry
Valued Guest
Barry

Totally agree, it’s the updates. I’ve been paying about $500 every two years for Nexus phones. That’s so that I can have the latest Android versions as Google release them. If Google would provide updates to the Pixel phones for four years then I wouldn’t mind paying double Nexus prices for a phone that will last twice as long.
But if they’re going to charge iPhone prices for a phone that will only receive updates for half as long as an iPhone, then in my mind the Pixels are effectively twice as expensive as an iPhone.

Member
Luke Vesty

Who keeps a phone longer than three years? The battery is totally ruined in any device after this amount of time.

David Anderton
Valued Guest
David Anderton

Not if you buy a phone with a replaceable battery or can watch a 5 minute YouTube clip on how to open your phone.

Member
Luke Vesty

You’re missing the point. Of course it’s possible, but most people don’t replace their sealed batteries. Especially in phones aimed at the mainstream. And for phones that have removable batteries, like something from LG, they’re not going to have the software support of the Pixel. This is the truth.

GregAndo
Valued Guest
GregAndo

This is why the resale of iPhone devices is generally much better. They slow way down though, when Android generally gets faster.

I would love to see an Android device come out with a promise of updates to 5 years so long as performance could be retained.

Qball
Valued Guest
Qball

Here’s a hypothesis for you: Google aren’t stupid. They have clearly priced the Pixels at very similar pricing structure to iPhones – deliberately. Now we all know that Apple don’t discount their phones and expect people to pay top dollar for the entire calendar year between updates. Perhaps Google are planning to stagger official price cuts every 3 months so they sell exponentially more Pixels throughout the year? They may even win over some traditional iPhone users and MAY even force Apple to concede to a similar pricing structure to maintain sales? Just a thought…..

SachmoJoe
Valued Guest
SachmoJoe

It’ll be interesting to see what we can get a grey import Pixel for after say 3 or 4 months. I got my S6 for $580 (including a $100 ebay discount code) about 6 months after it was released, and I believe brick and mortar stores here were still selling it for around a grand at the time.

Virtually every phone except the iPhone can usually be had for a pretty good discount a few months later.

GregAndo
Valued Guest
GregAndo

I don’t think you understand the iSheep mentality 😉

montalbert_scott
Valued Guest
montalbert_scott

Would be nice to believe this but seems unlikely

Member
Adam J
This feels like a massive Google social experiment. “How does our brand sit in people’s minds against Apple and Samsung?”. The problem is that anybody who knows Google knows that they suck at communicating and we never know whether one of their initiatives is likely to survive. I for one was eagerly waiting to update my reliable, trusty Nexus 4 (yes, it’s unscathed in its bumper). But I’m not spending that much to buy into an experiment, only to have Google realise “oh crap, we don’t carry the same brand recognition in mobiles as Apple and Samsung”. If the Pixel… Read more »
SUPERSHOPPER / Rod NZ
Valued Guest
SUPERSHOPPER / Rod NZ

You hit the nail on the head exactly right
Building up a Brand thats as appreciated by the customer – doesn’t count eh!
Wer’e to big to notice + we’l do what we want
anyway the catch cry.
Google – wake up and hear what your customers would like
Sent pasted article to them in feedback………
Good on you from SUPERSHOPPER Rod
New Zealand

H0OIler
Valued Guest
H0OIler
The Pixels are looking like good phones with enough solid upgrades from last year’s Nexus devices, such as 24/7 support, Daydream VR, free storage for full resolution photos, best camera, Qualcomm 821 chip, 4GB RAM, and especially Google Assistant. However the pricing seems obscene! I’m sure people would flock to it if its price was 20% less than what’s currently advertised. I was interested in the smaller Pixel – currently have the Nexus 6P, which I love but the 5’7″ is slightly too big to carry in pockets. I would’ve got the Nexus 5x last year if the specs was… Read more »
Budorat
Valued Guest
Budorat

Even this little analysis paints us a bit of a picture. At $1,419, the Pixel XL 128GB is $40 more expensive than Apple’s iPhone 7 with 256GB of storage. What’s going on there?

I’m sorry, but how can you compare the iPhone 7 price point to the Pixel XL price point, maybe a better comparison is comparing the Pixel XL to the iPhone 7 Plus, which just happen to be teh exact same price for the 128 Gb model.

Andrew
Valued Guest

This is what I was going to say too. When you compare similar sized phones you get the same price for the 128GB phone.

montalbert_scott
Valued Guest
montalbert_scott

And does anyone here think that the average person will choose a brand new product, pixel, over the top of the line iPhone at the same price…. #tellthemtheyredreaming

Member
Luke Vesty

They do with Samsung. Why not with Google?

SachmoJoe
Valued Guest
SachmoJoe

It took Samsung a long time to develop this mainstream appeal, and no other Android manufacturer to date has been able to join them at the top of the tree.

Member
Luke Vesty

And it’ll probably take Google a while too, but at least Google has the advantage of developing both the software AND the hardware of their devices. They’re taking the same approach as Apple because they can.

Duncan_J
Valued Guest
Duncan_J

I think the success of this will fall on how well Telstra/Verizon /etc push this on customers.

If they are incentivised to push customers to this-week-in-google phone then they could move the “swinging buyers” into a pixel.

Add in mindless fanboys and those to whom a ¢1400 phone isn’t a issue will that all be enough to achieve market success?

I want the Pixel xl 128 mb. They just priced it $200 away from anything close to reasonable.

mrpendulum
Valued Guest
mrpendulum
For years Apple has been playing catch up with Google. Bigger screens, multitasking, NFC, virtual assistants, etc. This is the year that Google stopped going forward, and decided that they needed to be like the competition – by taking a huge step back. The question is what do these phones offer over past devices. I am beyond outraged that they are delaying Android 7.1 for Nexus handsets. This is unprecedented. Their own keynote talked about the AI assistant been the next big thing in phones – then why artificially limit it to two devices as their main selling point. It’s… Read more »
Taleim
Valued Guest
Taleim

I wonder how much telstra exclusivity affects this too.

David Spencer-Cotton
Valued Guest
David Spencer-Cotton

The price is 100% NOT justified.
Take the iPhone , it has more advanced tech, taptic feedback, force touch screen, water resistance, faster prossesor, dual speakers, imessage (wtf google allo ,how hard) etc. And they are known as overpriced tech. What does that make the pixel? Extremely over priced tech?
Sticking with my Nexus 6p for now, perhaps if the pixel comes down in price ill consider it, but at this price, mite as well get an iPhone, more bang for my buck. Thought I would never say it.

Member
Luke Vesty

The Pixel has better AMOLED displays, higher resolution, more RAM, way faster charging, a bigger battery, a better camera, virtual reality support, better voice recognition and assistant services, unlimited cloud storage for full resolution photos and 4K video, a headphone port! For every feature the iPhone has, the Pixel has something else to balance the scales.

David Spencer-Cotton
Valued Guest
David Spencer-Cotton
-display: I wouldn’t say the pixel amoled is that much better than the iPhone 7. The iPhone 7 display is outstanding. -higher res: yep thats definaly a win for pixel, but only when using vr. Real world use is not noticeable. -more ram: ram is not something iOS ever needs to worry about. So that’s a mute point. -faster charging : there we go, pixel win -higher battery : sorry the iPhone will still last longer. -better camera : yet to be tester irl And the rest are software… So no I still don’t see the justification of the high… Read more »
Member
Luke Vesty
Just a few points. – AMOLED displays are way better than LCD. Contrast and black levels are simply stunning. Mark my words, the next iPhone will use AMOLED. – RAM still matters because as far as I understand, Apple still aggressively kills applications in the background to maintain OS stability. You don’t necessarily experience this with an Android device stacked with RAM. – You can’t conclude the iPhone will last longer than the Pixel. The iPhone has always been terrible with battery life (admittedly most phones are). It even had that horrid bug where iPhones were dying with 30% left… Read more »
David Spencer-Cotton
Valued Guest
David Spencer-Cotton
I have an iPhone sitting here next to my 6p and I can tell you the black levels are negligent at best. Displays are on par. Ram. Have you ever heard of an iPhone slowing down due to lack of ram, no. Because yes it does aggressively manage itself. Hav you heard of android phones slowing down from lack of ram, all the time. So in real world experience exsessive ram on androids are only going to help it be as stable as iPhone and it’s ram management. Yes I can conclude that iphones plus phones will be better than… Read more »
Member
Luke Vesty
The displays might be on par to your eyes at this moment but LCD simply isn’t as good. For starters, AMOLED is more power efficient. If you want black you just turn off the back light for individual pixels. It’s for this reason AMOLED can offer features like always on display tricks while LCD will just waste battery. It’s also for this reason that AMOLED is able to produce much deeper blacks and thus better contrast than LCD. It’s not necessarily noticeable in every instance but the darker the image, the more it shows. It’s why TV display technology is… Read more »
Member
I think the price of the pixel is too expensive aswell, however…Whilst they are not front facing, the pixels have two speakers, android has more customization than apple, nougat means mutli-tasking, you don’t know the IPhone is faster YET (thought it likely will be) google assistant may be better than siri, the camera of the pixel could be better than the IPhone, the screen resolution of the pixel phones are sharper. Note some things I said we won’t know til people have had hands on with the Pixel, but my point is lets not assume IPhone has more advantages before… Read more »
GregAndo
Valued Guest
GregAndo

It could actually be smoother than iPhone 7, I have found the Note 7 to be smoother in my comparisons thus far.

Budorat
Valued Guest
Budorat

Don’t get the iPhone 7. I got the 6S+ last year as a social experiment and it has been okay, but iOS 10 has ruined the phone, I prefer the previous version much better. I personally am buying the Pixel XL 128 Gb Black version and can not wait. It is perfect, nope, but I personally think that no phone is ever really perfect, it may be the reason why I have owned so many devices over the past year (iPhone 6S+, Note 7, S7 Edge, HTC 10, Nexus 6P, Nexus 6, HTC One M8 to name a few).

GregAndo
Valued Guest
GregAndo

I hope you can deal with the loss in screen real estate.

Jamie S
Valued Guest
Jamie S

Curious, why do you think iOS 10 has ruined your iPhone? I actually like it other than the notifications which could be improved with a software update

Budorat
Valued Guest
Budorat

I don’t like how it handles lock screen notifications now. I can no longer delete emails from the lock screen, where previously I could. I think the whole OS feels “wrong”, I can’t put a finger on exactly what it is about it now, but I just don’t like it. iTunes for example, I really don’t like what they did with that, there was nothing wrong with it before the update.

Jamie S
Valued Guest
Jamie S

Has anyone else considered why anyone should buy a pixel over an iPhone 7/7plus? I know I have. The speakers on the iPhone 7/7 plus are just as good if not better than the 6P and it has water resistance. It’s just a pity it runs ios, the notifications are a mess and it doesn’t have a back button.

ripnexus
Valued Guest
ripnexus

2 days too late to reply to this .. but the nexus 6p speakers are far far better in quality and loudness than the iphone 7/7+ .
Have tested it myself on several occasions. Play anything on iPhone 7+, play the same thing on nexus 6p and you can barely hear the iphone 7+ anymore.

Jamie S
Valued Guest
Jamie S

Well I didn’t test both side by side but the 6P always sounded a bit tinny and distorted at higher levels to me. The iPhone might be softer but the quality sounded similar to the HTC 10 but louder. I guess my point is comparing the iPhone to the Pixel phones which have no water resistance and a single bottom firing speaker.

Duncan_J
Valued Guest
Duncan_J

Headphone jack.

*mic drop.

Member
Luke Vesty

Exactly. We’ve got a handful of people getting cranky at Google over a new phone while forgetting Apple is actually REMOVING features!

GregAndo
Valued Guest
GregAndo

The lack of a back button is the main reason I couldn’t make the jump. Going back was always inconsistent. I expected a much better experience but it wasn’t the bug free or consistent easy to use experience everyone sold me.

I think the real competition is the Note 7, which is amazing to use.

Member
Luke Vesty

The Note 7 is dead man.

ripnexus
Valued Guest
ripnexus

Like Harambe, Note 7 will be missed dearly.
#rip

Member

It’s too expensive, the S7 edge is a lot cheaper, even the new Xperia XZ costs only $899 on ebay

Jesus Machine
Valued Guest
Jesus Machine

I will hang on to 6P until it Android P is released and get a 12 month old 2017 Pixel 2.0 or whatever it will be at the time 2 years down the track

Fred
Valued Guest
Fred
1) No phone, no flagship, is worth the prices they try to charge for them. The profit margin is extreme, which is why they all try to ape and aim for this space. But smartphones reached a plateau 2-3 years ago – nothing since has revolutionised the space. It’s the MS Windows problem, you don’t need the upgrade because it offers you nothing of value. 2) These phones are NOT premium – which is a major problem if you are trying to charge premium prices. Featurewise they are deficient, and lookswise they are ‘nothing’ at best. They are midrange, compromised.… Read more »
Member
Luke Vesty

My God some of these reactions are pretty extraordinary.

Duncan_J
Valued Guest
Duncan_J

Why is the Pixel not premium? I’m interested in your criteria

Fred
Valued Guest
Fred
Premium, in this context, means “without compromise”. We can all list the attributes we expect from a premium phone, and understand what it takes to be competitive and up with the other flagships. And we are happy to label a phone a failure when it falls short. Now, the pixel efforts lack many of the expected attributes. They lack a microSD slot, waterproofing, wireless charging, screen, etc. They also lack the ‘looks’ of ‘premium’. Realistically the only thing you can point to as up with the flagships is the SoC. But that’s only about $50 of the system price (and… Read more »
Member
Luke Vesty

Is the iPhone 7 compromised in any way? Low resolution LCD, less RAM than many Android devices, no headphone port, a small non removable battery, no removable storage, what is perhaps now the third best smartphone camera, “large bezels” with a design that hasn’t changed in three years?

Your logic is inconsistent.

Fred
Valued Guest
Fred

Logic doesn’t apply to apple – the sheep are happy to get fleeced. Problem is, they are all already spoken for, so nobody left to buy google’s attempt.

Oh, and I wouldn’t say that apple were premium either, they’ve always been the Bose of smartphones.

Member
Luke Vesty

And many average consumers consider Bose a premium brand, rightly or wrongly. Same with (ugh) Beats.

It’s all about perception within the mainstream.

Member

The xiaomi Mi 5s definitely does look the part, and the price point is amazing. Slap cyanogen mod on it and it’s a beast.

I’ve always said Google needs to bring out an iPhone clone (build wise) with android on it, and price it super competitively and they’d kill it. They did all those things, but omitted features (proper waterproofing) and then charged the same as iPhone. 20% cheaper and they’d be smartphone maker of the year.

montalbert_scott
Valued Guest
montalbert_scott

It does seem to be a gamble doesn’t it

Member

Mainly that the screen is too small, for those that like it small 5″ will do, 5.5″ is too small for those that like it larger.

It also doesn’t have wireless charging support and is way too expensive for the 128GB model which I would need as it doesn’t have support for SDCARDs.

Apart from that its not different enough, was hoping for Tango.

GregAndo
Valued Guest
GregAndo

Not only is 5.5″ to small, the on screen nav buttons mean it is smaller than iPhone Plus now except the rare times you are in full screen mode.

pukeyluke
Valued Guest
pukeyluke

These “online polls” don’t really tell us anything about people’s buying habits.
18% will buy a Pixel, 29% undecided. Lets conservatively say a quarter of those undecided 29% (approx 7%) do indeed buy a Pixel phone, that gives us 18%+7%=25%.
Do we really think that 25% of Ausdroid readers will have a Pixel/XL phone in their possession in 6 months time? I don’t think so!! If this online poll is accurate well then I say the Google/HTC Pixel Phone is a huge marketing success!!!

Jamie S
Valued Guest
Jamie S

Well I voted no but I may pick one up after I have actually seen it and played with it. I also want to see reviews before I commit to pre-ordering or buying one on release Day.

montalbert_scott
Valued Guest
montalbert_scott
I am waiting for reviews tbh. Which is very unusual for me.. I always buy Google releases straight away. The more I think about the price of it the more I am considering hanging onto my 6p and waiting until the price drops or ebay ones pop up. I am not getting much more than I have in my 6p and with a premium 400 price increase from the 6p original price it’s a very tough sell. Looking forward to checking out a moto Z for another near clean android software experience instead. Unfortunately I suspect this phone will be… Read more »
Member
Luke Vesty

The thing is though, you have a 6P which is still an amazing phone! You don’t need to upgrade. It’s the people with two or three year old phones that should be looking at this. You don’t need the latest and greatest every year. Save your pennies and get the barnstorming Pixel 2!

Member

I got a Moto Z from Clove, it’s awesome! I think you will enjoy it

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