+ Sunday October 20th, 2019

Some further details of Samsung’s Galaxy S10+ have emerged today thanks to purported benchmark scoring on Geekbench.

These scores are very, very easily faked, so we’re not entirely sure how reliable this rumour is. Frankly, the details are entirely predictable, and that makes them plausible, two elements of a fairly reasonable leak.

In this case, the leaked benchmark score from Slashleaks purports to confirm the inclusion of a Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 processor (which is almost certain for the US market) alongside 6GB of RAM (again, entirely reasonable).

s10_benchmarked

How do these rumours compare?

Some have observed that these scores are virtually identical to the Kirin 980 processor made by Huawei for the Mate 20 range, and they’re very, very close. There’s little doubt that the Kirin 980 has been the fastest chipset around for a little while now, but the Qualcomm 855 processor has seemingly caught up.

The other thing I’m more interested in seeing is how the rest-of-the-world Samsung Galaxy S10 range performs with the Exynos chipset Samsung will use. One would hope it’s comparible to the Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 speed, if not faster.

Samsung-Galaxy-S10-e1546466503654

What else do we know about Samsung’s Galaxy S10 range?

Being Samsung’s 10th year in the Galaxy S range,  we’re expecting some special things. Already confirmed are ultra-slim bezels and a screen that goes top to bottom and edge to edge, without a notch or anything else.

We understand Samsung has opted for a cutout camera rather than a notch for housing sensors, and this will feature across three screen sizes from 5.8-inch to 6.4-inch. An in-screen fingerprint sensor is as good as confirmed, and the headphone jack will remain.

The only things we know for certain are that the Galaxy S10 is coming, and it’ll launch on 20 February 2019 just ahead of MWC, running Android 9 Pie with One UI. It promises to be an exciting development, and I can’t wait to see what surprises Samsung has in store.

Chris Rowland   Managing Editor

Chris Rowland

Chris has been at the forefront of smartphone reporting in Australia since smartphones were a thing, and has used mobile phones since they came with giant lead-acid batteries that were "transportable" and were carried in a shoulder bag.

Today, Chris publishes one of Australia's most popular technology websites, Ausdroid. His interests include mobile (of course), as well as connected technology and how it can make all our lives easier.

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