LG video ahead of MWC shows off special navigation gestures reminiscent of Google’s Project Soli

Earlier today we received a “heads up” from LG Australia advising us of the company’s MWC plans. No sooner than we’d seen the email ourselves, it appears that many other sites also received similar. There’s now a video confirming a pre-MWC press briefing for February 24th.

In the video, the focus is on gestures; a wave of a hand from left to right over a piece of paper makes the words “Goodbye Touch” appear. A wave back brings up the words “MWC 2019 LG Premiere”, and finally a push from the bottom reveals the date and location for the event.

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We have had some debate internally about what this actually means. Rumours are that LG will announce it’s next major phone installment in the form of the LG G8 ThinQ. That’s not so surprising, but what’s that got to do with gestures?

Could this be Project Soli?

It appears that LG will be showing off some new technology, allowing the user to navigate without touching the phone itself. We haven’t seen these rumours before, but it immediately brings to mind Google’s Project Soli technology. Will the new technology debut in LG’s next smartphone?

Only time will tell. Other rumours include an optional second screen attachment which might be LG’s answer to the foldable phone technology being developed by other brands.

Truth be told, the rumours are always weird and interesting when it comes to LG, but the main things we’re expecting are a 6.1-inch display (or thereabouts), with either 2K or 4K resolution, as well as a Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 processor; the newer 855 processor will likely be kept back until LG releases its V-series phone later in 2019.

Ausdroid will be at MWC (and the pre-show launch events) so we’ll bring you the latest on LG’s event once it’s under way.

Last modified on 23 January 2019 5:35 pm

Chris Rowland: @ozcjr Chris has been at the forefront of smartphone reporting in Australia since smartphones were a thing, and has used mobile phones since they came with giant lead-acid batteries that were "transportable" and were carried in a shoulder bag. Today, Chris publishes one of Australia's most popular technology websites, Ausdroid. His interests include mobile (of course), as well as connected technology and how it can make all our lives easier.